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Family's Campus -Children aged 7 or above - Oral Diseases - Why is there tooth decay?

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Why is there tooth decay?

There is often a layer of dental plaque on the surfaces of our teeth, which is filled with bacteria.
Photograph of a tooth with its surface covered by a layer of bacteria-rich dental plaque.

Every time we eat and drink , the bacteria will use the sugar of the food and produce acid.
Photograph showing that the bacteria in dental plaque will produce acid when it comes into contact with food.

The acid will damage the teeth.
Photograph showing the tooth being attacked by acid.

Saliva can reduce acid attacks towards our teeth by neutralizing it and prevent further loss of minerals. However, it must have enough time for saliva to work.
Photograph showing how saliva protects the tooth against acid attack.

If we eat and drink frequently, saliva will not have enough time to work.The minerals on tooth surface will continue to lose out, and then tooth decay may occur.
Photograph showing how eating and drinking frequently increases the chances of attack to the teeth.

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